EDJ Lab

Michelle

Michelle Murphy is the Director of the Technoscience Research Unit. Michelle is a feminist technoscience studies scholar and historian of the recent past.  She is the author of The Economization of Life (Duke UP 2017), Seizing the Means of Reproduction: Feminism, Health and Technoscience (Duke UP, 2012) and Sick Building Syndrome: Environmental Politics, Technoscience, and Women Workers (Duke UP 2006), winner of the Fleck Prize from the Society for the Social Studies of Science.  Her current project is called Alter Life in the Ongoing Aftermath of Industrial Chemicals.  It explores the infrastructures and decolonial futures of life already altered by industrially produced chemicals, especially endocrine disrupting chemicals.  She is currently involved in collaborations with Environmental Data and Governance Initiative, the Endocrine Disruptors Action Group, Engineered Worlds, and  the Politics of Evidence Working Group.  From 1996 – 2007, she was editor of the RaceSci Website.  Michelle Murphy is Red River Métis from Winnipeg.  She has a PhD in History of Science from Harvard University and is Professor of History and Women and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto.

405 Floorplan

Kristen Bos is the Lab Manager of the Technoscience Research Unit.  She is a Métis archaeologist-cum-anthropologist, activist, and researcher of Indigenous material culture. She is a graduate of the University of Oxford and a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto. She has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarships (CGS) Doctoral Scholarship and the President’s Award for Outstanding Native Student of the Year. Her research engages with the material culture of the Métis, lndigenous feminism, and settler colonial studies with an emphasis on decolonizing methodologies and transgressing disciplinary boundaries. She dreams in vivid colours and her goals include advancing Indigenous and non-Western stories, epistemologies, and ontologies.

Vanessa

Vanessa Gray is the lead on TRU’s Environmental Justice research. She is an Anishnaabe kwe from Aamjiwnaang First Nation, located in Canada’s Chemical Valley. As a grassroots organizer, land defender, and educator, Vanessa works to decolonize environmental justice research by linking scholarly findings to traditional teachings. She continues to take part in a diversity of tactics such as direct action, classroom lectures, co-hosting Toxic Tours, and Water Gatherings.

reena

Reena Shadaan is a doctoral student in the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University. Her work looks at the gendered dimensions of environmental justice and environmental health, including activism, and reproductive justice considerations. Much of Shadaan’s work to date examines the largely women-led and comprised justice movements in the aftermath of the Bhopal Gas Disaster (Bhopal, India – 1984). Currently, Shadaan is working with the Toronto-based Nail Technicians’ Network and the Healthy Nail Salon Network in response to nail technicians’ occupational/environmental health concerns (reproductive, respiratory, dermatological, and musculoskeletal), as well as the precarious labour conditions in the industry.

ladan

Ladan Siad is a Creative Technologist working at the intersections of art, design and technology to tell narratives about the world that is possible when radical visionary change flourishes. Ladan is a natural born collaborator and has used their skills to teach and help in many community-based projects.  Drawing from the imagery of 70s Somali Funk Album Covers, little known black subversive DC history and the sounds of 90s R&B, Siad, who is a self-taught and community supported multidisciplinary creative quilting together global black genres into a visual and audio tapestry of home everywhere. Ladan will be starting at OCAD in the Digital Futures Program (MDes) in September 2018. Ladan holds a BA in Criminology and Psychology from York University.