Current

alessandro

Alessandro Delfanti is a media and science studies scholar working on the political economy of digital technologies. He is the author of Biohackers: The Politics of Open Science (Pluto Press 2013). His current research focuses on cultures and practices of resistance within the digital economy. Alessandro is Assistant Professor of Culture and New Media at the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology (ICCIT) at the University of Toronto Mississauga, and has a graduate appointment at the Faculty of Information.

Patrick

Patrick Keilty is a feminist and queer media and technology scholar. He is Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto. His primary research interest is the politics of digital infrastructures in the online pornography industry. His work spans issues in visual culture, sexual politics, information studies, critical algorithm studies, political economy, database logic, critical theory, and theories of gender, sexuality, and race. He is the author of more than a dozen peer-reviewed articles, editor of three journal special issues, an edited book, and has delivered more than 40 refereed conference papers and 35 invited lectures. He holds a PhD in Information Studies with a concentration in Women’s Studies (now Gender Studies) from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Sophia Jaworski is a PhD student in the faculty of Anthropology and the Women and Gender Studies collaborative program at the University of Toronto. Her research interests problematize ‘medically unexplained chronic illness’ through investigating the politics and lived experiences of toxins and chemicals in everyday life. Her dissertation examines how symptoms are treated as environment-linked using ethnographic fieldwork and visual methods in a biomedical context. It focuses on the theoretical intersections between inhumanisms and figures of the ‘environment,’ and the tensions in power between biomedicine, mental health and the pharmaceutical dynamics of medicalization. She asks: “how can the integration of feminist understandings of knowledges and affects contribute to an interrogation of the current politics of life and capitalism in Canada?”

alexAlex Jung is a researcher and incoming graduate student in political science at the University of Toronto. Focusing on current and future scenarios on the Korean peninsula, Alex works on articulating how information is to be mobilised for the public good in environments of historically controlled access to information in source, form, and content. Prior to joining the lab, Alex studied the philosophy of belief and media representation of androgyny at the University of Chicago—and is invested in thoroughly examining the accompanying ethos and teleology that permeate the project.

ericaErica Violet Lee is a graduate student in the Department of Social Justice Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. She is the nēhiyaw philosopher queen, an Indigenous feminist, and community organizer from inner-city Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. You can find her writing here.

martina
Martina Schlünder is a EU Marie Postdoctoral Fellow.  She received her doctorate in the History of Medicine from the Charité, Universitätsmedizin-Berlin having earlier become an MD practising psychiatry and neurology. She has been a research fellow at Justus Liebig University at Gießen funded by the German Research Council and at Ludwik Fleck Center/Collegium Helveticum ETH Zurich. She worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science and as a visiting fellow at the Department for Social Studies of Medicine at McGill University in Montréal.

matt priceMatt Price works in the areas of digital politics, digital humanities, science and technology studies.  He has a PhD in History and Philosophy of Science from Stanford University and is an Instructor in the History Department, New College, and at the Faculty of Information.  He leads the coding and technical side of the TRU’s contributions to the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative.

 

Nicholas Shapiro is a fellow at the Technoscience Research Unit and at Public Lab. His research leverages interdisciplinary collaborations to interrogate the limits and possibilities of environmental change. His work ranges from collaboratively developing air quality monitoring and mitigation technologies for impacted communities (more [/]here) to working on a utopic art project known as the aerocene. He will join the faculty of UCLA’s Institute of Society and Genetics in July 2019.

emilyEmily Astra-Jean Simmonds is a PhD candidate in the department of Science and Technology Studies at York University. Her activist research practice is primarily energized by questions about, consent, exposure and colonial infrastructures, toxic sovereignties and the biopolitics of settler colonialism in the neoliberal present.  Currently, her work focuses on how uranium economies and ecologies amplify and produce colonial geographies, and the various ways in which asymmetrical exposures to toxins and radiological hazards are rendered permissible. As a Métis feminist scholar she is committed to actions that support just and mutually considered livable futures.  She is also a member of the Civic Laboratory for Environmental Action Research (CLEAR) based in St. John’s NFLD, and the Digital Research Ethics Collaboratory in Toronto, ON.

shaq

Shaquilla Singh is an undergrad at the University of Toronto double majoring in Computer Science and the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology. She is on Civic Tech Toronto’s steering committee and last summer worked for Code for Canada. She previously served as Design Editor and Managing Online Editor at UofT’s campus newspaper The Varsity.dawnDawn Walker is a PhD student at the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto. Her research focuses on citizen participation in technology design practices, in particular for environmental advocacy.  Sitting at the intersection of the technology design, information practices,  and civic engagement, her research bridges socio-technocal design approaches with critical social science inquiry.